Category: Press

In The Bustle Booth With Haley Lu Richardson

When celebrities come into Bustle HQ in New York, whether it’s for a photoshoot, videoshoot, or a Facebook Live, we want to give them the chance to leave their mark. Literally. So we hand them a pen, a piece of paper, a few questions, and ask them to get creative. The rest is up to them. This time, Columbus’ Haley Lu Richardson is leaving her mark in the Bustle Booth.

Haley Lu Richardson is quickly becoming one of the most versatile young actors in Hollywood. In the past year, she’s had supporting roles in two major films, as a teen in love in the critically acclaimed The Edge of Seventeen and as a horrified kidnap victim in M. Night Shyamalan’s Split. It’s a pretty impressive resumé for any actor, let alone one who burst onto the scene just four years ago with a starring role in the Freeform show Ravenswood. Now, Richardson is taking the leap into leading roles with Columbus, a moving drama in theaters now.

In Columbus, Richardson plays Casey, a recent high school graduate stuck in her hometown who is inspired to share her passion for architecture when she meets Jin (John Cho), the son of a famous architecture professor. The film, currently enjoying a limited release, has clearly stuck with the actor. During her Bustle visit, she drew Columbus’ First Christian Church and North Christian Church, both designed by Eliel Saarinen and favorites of Casey. She also still has Columbus, IN, as a weather location in her phone. Aside from her commitment to her work, Richardson revealed her love of John Lennon and more during her stop in the Bustle Booth.

SOURCE BUSTLE.COM

Haley Lu Richardson Joins Oscar Isaac in Nazi Thriller ‘Operation Finale’

Haley Lu Richardson Joins Oscar Isaac in Nazi Thriller ‘Operation Finale’

Chris Weitz is directing the drama, with Ben Kingsley playing Adolf Eichmann.

Haley Lu Richardson, one of the stars of M. Night Shyamalan’s Split, has joined the mission of Operation Finale, MGM’s story of the capture of Nazi Adolf Eichmann.

Oscar Isaac is leading the cast of the thriller, with Ben Kingsley playing Eichmann and Joe Alwyn playing Eichmann’s son.

Chris Weitz is directing the drama, which is said to echo thrillers such as Argo and Munich. Matthew Orton wrote the original screenplay.

Eichmann was considered one of the architects of the Holocaust and oversaw the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Jews. After World War II, he fled to Argentina, where he lived in hiding. Israel’s spy agency, Mossad, eventually discovered Eichmann’s whereabouts, and in a tense operation captured him and smuggled him out of the country.

Richardson will play Sylvia Herman, the sweet-faced girlfriend of Klaus Eichmann (Alwyn) who was fiercely in love and did not want to hear her father’s warning about him and his family. She eventually turns over Klaus and his family to Mossad intelligence.

Lior Raz, Melanie Laurent and Nick Kroll are also on the call sheet.

Production begins Oct. 1 in Argentina.

Brian Kavanaugh-Jones and Fred Berger are producing the project along with Isaac and Inspire Entertainment’s Jason Spire.

Richardson, who also appeared in The Edge of Seventeen, can currently be seen in Columbus, the Sundance indie that also stars John Cho and is earning strong reviews. In the can is the period drama The Chaperone, written by Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes.

She is repped by Gersh, Arts Entertainment and Coast to Coast Talent Group.

SOURCE THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

City Of Columbus Plays ‘Lead Character’ In New Film

Actors, producers and Gov. Eric Holcomb (R-Ind.) turned out Thursday night for a premiere of the new film “Columbus.”

Columbus is known for its modern architecture, which plays a large role in the new film. In the movie, a Columbus native sparks up a friendship with a visitor and begins sharing parts of her community.

Haley Lu Richardson stars in the movie with John Cho. Richardson says it’s unlike any project she’s worked on.

“I feel like the things I learned in this one were like all creative because it was such a creative, inspiring set to be on and people to work with,” Richardson says.

Erin Hawkins, the Director of Marketing with the Columbus Area Visitor’s Center, says architecture plays a central role in the story.

“It’s not just the backdrop in this film, it’s almost like a third, lead character in the film,” Hawkins says.

The movie premiered at YES Cinema in Columbus, which will continue showings throughout the month. Showings are scheduled in multiple Indiana cities over the next few weeks including in Bloomington, Indianapolis, Nashville, Fort Wayne and Lafayette.

SOURCE INDIANAPUBLICMEDIA

Breaking Big: Haley Lu Richardson heads from The Edge of Seventeen to Columbus

The 22-year-old actress gives a powerful, star-making performance as a small-town teen dreaming of bigger things

When first-time director Kogonada asked Haley Lu Richardson to star in Columbus, she had one big question: “Why me?”

“It turns out his wife had seen me in an episode of Law & Order,” Richardson says, laughing. “So I’m really grateful I did Law & Order!”

The 22-year-old actress made waves as Hailee Steinfeld’s longtime best friend in The Edge of Seventeen and as a teenage girl facing off against James McAvoy’s kidnapper in Split, but with Kogonada’s indie drama, she steps into the spotlight with her first major lead performance. And what a performance: Richardson stars as Casey, a recent high school grad in Columbus, Indiana — a real-life Midwestern mecca for modernist architecture. Casey’s developed her own love of architecture, but she can’t bring herself to pursue her dreams and abandon her addict mother, even at the urging of her new friend, the similarly lost Jin (John Cho). It’s a powerful, honest portrayal of the uncertainty that comes with being a young adult, and it’s that uncertainty that Richardson immediately identified with.

“I make dumb jokes and run around screaming, and Casey’s much more still and thoughtful,” Richardson says. “But I connected to that whole idea of where I am in life and trying to figure out what’s next.”

Columbus is the first film from Kogonada, who’s best known for his clever, inventive video essays about filmmaking, and his debut feature is a quiet, meditative look at how art can affect our lives — bolstered by thoughtful, often wordless performances by Cho and Richardson.

“We didn’t do much rehearsal,” Richardson says. “Actually, we didn’t do any rehearsal. I think we read through the script once — me, Kogonada, and John. But other than that, any time we met to rehearse, it wasn’t an actual rehearsal. It was just sitting there, figuring out who Casey was and what was going on beneath the surface in all of these scenes. We talked about the dynamic of her and her mom. Everything she does and everything that holds her back and everything that has forced her to grow up so quickly is because of that relationship with her mom and her childhood. That relationship kind of shapes who she is.”

The film also operates as a love letter of sorts to Columbus itself, as Casey shows Jin around her hometown and introduces him to some of her favorite buildings by architecture legends like Eero Saarinen or I.M. Pei.

“When you’re in Columbus, and you see that architecture, I don’t know how you couldn’t appreciate it and want to know about it,” she says. “You drive from Indianapolis to Columbus, and you go through all these cornfields and all this open farmland to then get to the middle of nowhere, where there’s this little pocket of modern architecture. And it’s just kind of nuts. It’s just so special that it’s so unexpected, but there’s so much history there.”

Richardson started her performing career in dance, not acting, but at the age of 16, after starting her junior year in high school, she put together a presentation trying to convince her parents to let her move from Arizona to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career. “Luckily, my parents are kind of kooky and understood that and took that chance,” she says. Since then, she’s done comedy, twisty thrillers, and now, a moving indie drama. Up next, she’ll star as flapper icon Louise Brooks in the period drama The Chaperone.

“Every character I get into, I get to learn about a new place, a new person, a new life situation,” she says. “I feel like it makes me more empathetic, just as a human.”

SOURCE ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

Haley Lu Richardson on why ‘Columbus’ is her most fulfilling film yet

V sat down with the actor at the Sundance Film Festival where the new film was met with critical praise.

Although 22-year-old Haley Lu Richardson recently starred in M. Night Shyamalan’s trippy hit thriller Split, and The Edge of Seventeen, she’s more eager to see how fans will respond to her upcoming role in the indie flick Columbus. The first feature-length film by Korean director Kogonada (the auteur’s chosen nom d’artiste) has a quiet, Before Sunrise-esque plot: Richardson plays a recent high school grad named Casey who befriends Jin (played by John Cho), a visitor to Casey’s hometown of Columbus, Indiana. In real life, the city has a massive amount of modernist architecture and public art, setting a gorgeous backdrop for the characters’ heavy conversations.

Columbus is, according to Richardson, “the most fulfilling role I’ve ever done.” She also notes that she was initially pretty freaked out about taking it on. “There’s no intense explosion or special effects, just talking. You have nowhere to hide…you’re fully exposed to yourself as that character.” That Richardson had to be so emotionally raw for her role left her wondering “why they didn’t hire Dakota Fanning.” She adds, “It’s super refreshing to sit down and read a pure story of two people just going through life.”

Following her role in Columbus, Richardson hopes to have a career like fellow actors Shailene Woodley and Emma Watson: “Those are girls that kind of look like me and have had similar experiences, but they’re bad ass human beings and inspire me.”

In her downtime, Richardson enjoys crocheting. She even has her own Etsy shop, Hooked By Haley Lu, which sells fringed bikini tops and off-the-shoulder minidresses fit for Coachella. “I should set up a booth. I’ll get my friends to model,” she jokes. As for her own style, it’s still evolving: “It’s a little all over the place, kind of like my personality.”

SOURCE V MAGAZINE

Flaunt – Photoshoot

The “Split” and “The Edge of Seventeen” star tells us about dancing professionally and her respect for sisterhood

Haley Lu Richardson licks banana pudding off her spoon, her hazel eyes popping. It’s love at first sample. Giddy, intoxicated with the sweet perfumes of Magnolia Bakery, the young rising star orders the pudding with a side of red velvet cheesecake. Donning slip-ons embellished with avocados, post-photo shoot athleisure, and her golden hair wrapped in a loose bun, it is apparent that this is her safe space: comfy with dessert on the way. At a time when millennials are losing their social cues to awkward phone pauses, Richardson’s dynamic personality makes for vibrant conversation.

Most recently starring in M. Night Shyamalan’s Split opposite a psychopathic James McAvoy, and in 2016’s critically-acclaimed The Edge of Seventeen opposite former Flaunt cover Hailee Steinfeld. Richardson’s acting career is unfolding just as she dreamed it would when she moved to Los Angeles five years ago, transitioning from aspirations of a career in dance.

“The thing I loved most about dance and doing all these competitions was telling stories,” says Richardson. “Emoting, and taking the lyrics of a song and turning it into some sort of art that hopefully affects people, that’s what acting is, just not physically – it’s more of an intimate thing.”

Now 21, after dancing competitively for ten years in her hometown of Phoenix, Arizona, Richardson met her first best friend in Los Angeles, Emily, after partnering with her at a dance class.

She decided to pursue acting after realizing that the physical strain on the body would only give her a short career in professional dance. Watching the young stars on Disney Channel shows, and seeing the rise of Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games series (2012-2015), not only proved to Richardson that becoming an actress was possible, but it showed her that it could also be a fulfilling career. She moved to Los Angeles with no idea how to search for auditions or agents. Utilizing her competitive dance contacts, she spent her first year dancing in the background for TV shows and playing the love interest in music videos.

“It was doing the same thing over and over like a prop-kind of dance,” Richardson begins, while I slice a piece of the red velvet cheesecake. “It’s interesting because the thing that I can do as a career, that is also storytelling and emoting, like dance, is acting. The higher you go in acting, the more you get to dig deep in telling a story.”

Both of her roles in Split and The Edge of Seventeen challenged Richardson to translate true friendship on camera. Her deeply rooted respect for sisterhood is what breathes her characters to life. When she talks about her best friends from dance, she refers to them as her future bridesmaids. When she talks of her costars, she references the immediate sense of trust she felt, and how that allowed her to overcome the trials and tribulations her characters faced.

“In Split, me, Jess [Sula], and Anya [Taylor-Joy] had that trust between the three of us. We had to cry, we had to scream, we had to hit things in these uncomfortably-high stakes,” says Richardson. Conversely, “The Edge of Seventeen is such a perfect representation of what it means to have a girlfriend that’s a best friend. It’s so important because it is kind of like a sister. And having a group of girls is a sisterhood, only not in the sorority kind of way, but in the actual family kind of way.”

While many aspiring actresses change their style, their look, and their entire attitude to fit a generic Hollywood starlet mold, it’s refreshing to see Haley Lu Richardson making a name for herself by being unapologetically her: laughing loudly and stuffing her face with cake.

SOURCE FLAUNT MAGAZINE

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